Join Our Mailing List
Email:

"Becoming Whole" Articles


Short articles on psychological types and individuation


May 2016 | Introverted Thinking in the Shadow II
"The unconscious thinking reaches the surface in the form of obsessive ideas which are invariably of a negative and depreciatory character." — Carl Jung

April 2016 | Introverted Thinking in the Shadow
"What he dislikes most of all is introverted thinking - thinking about philosophical principles or abstractions or basic questions of life." — Marie-Louise von Franz

March 2016 | Extraverted Intuition in the Shadow II
". . . the archaic intuitions come to the surface and exert their pernicious influence, forcing themselves on the individual and producing compulsive ideas of the most perverse kind." — Carl Jung

February 2016 | Extraverted Intuition in the Shadow
"Whereas true extraverted intuition is possessed of a singular resourcefulness, a 'good nose' for objectively real possibilities, this archaicized intuition has an amazing flare for all the ambiguous, shadowy, sordid, dangerous possibilities working in the background" — Carl Jung

January 2016 | Introverted Intuition in the Shadow II
"... intuition, the noblest gift of man, [turns] into meddlesome officiousness, poking into every corner; instead of gazing into the far distance, it descends to the lowest level of human meanness." — C. G. Jung

November/December 2015 | Introverted Intuition in the Shadow
Although his intuition may be stimulated by external objects, it does not concern itself with external possibilities but with what the external object has released within him.(CW 6, par. 656)

October 2015 | Introverted Feeling in the Shadow II
"It is an outstanding peculiarity of unconscious impulses that, when deprived of energy by lack of conscious recognition, they take on a destructive character, and this happens as soon as they cease to be compensatory" — C. G. Jung

September 2015 | Introverted Feeling in the Shadow
" "These preexisting mental images into contact with which the stream of our personal experience comes, I call the subjective factor" — C. G. Jung

July/August 2015 | ES in the Shadow II
"If people can be educated to see the lowly side of their own natures, it may be hoped that they will also learn to understand and to love their fellow men better." — Carl Jung (CW 7, Par. 439)

June 2015 | ES in the Shadow
"The unconscious personality can best be described as an extraverted sensation type of a rather low and primitive order." — Carl Jung (CW 6, par. 663)

May 2015 | ET in the Shadow II
"Although the unconscious thinking is archaic, its reductive tendencies help to compensate the occasional fits of trying to exalt the ego into the subject. If this should nevertheless happen as a result of complete suppression of the counterbalancing subliminal processes, the unconscious thinking goes over into open opposition and gets projected." — Carl Jung (CW 6, par. 643)

April 2015 | ET in the Shadow
"Although the unconscious thinking is archaic, its reductive tendencies help to compensate the occasional fits of trying to exalt the ego into the subject." — Carl Jung (CW 6, par. 643)

March 2015 | Extraverted Feeling in the Shadow II
"Often he is gauche in his behavior, painfully anxious to escape notice, or else remarkably unconcerned and childishly naive." — Carl Jung (CW 6, par. 635)

February 2015 | Extraverted Feeling in the Shadow
"Often he is gauche in his behavior, painfully anxious to escape notice, or else remarkably unconcerned and childishly naive." — Carl Jung (CW 6, par. 635)

January 2015 | The Shadow Types
". . .beneath the neglected functions there lie hidden far higher individual values which. . . are of greatest value for individual life, and therefore vital values that can endow the life of the individual with an intensity and beauty he will vainly seek in his collective function." — Carl Jung (CW 6, par. 113)

November/December 2014 | Recovering Forgotten Gifts
"When a function that should normally be conscious lapses into the unconscious, its specific energy passes into the unconscious too." — Carl Jung (CW6, par. 763)

October 2014 | Type Falsification: Costs and Benefits
"I do not think it improbable, in view of one's experience, that a reversal of type often proves exceedingly harmful to the physiological well-being of the organism, usually causing acute exhaustion." — Carl Jung (CW6, par. 561

September 2014 | Falsification and the Un-lived Life
". . . he must, as is often the case with children, re-enact under unconscious compulsion the unlived lives of his parents." — Carl Jung (CW 6, par. 307)

July/August 2014 | Falsification of Type; Pedro Mendes
"As a rule, whenever such a falsification of type takes place . . . the individual becomes neurotic later, and can be cured only by developing the attitude consonant with his nature." — Carl Jung (CG Jung, CW6, par. 560)

June 2014 | Stages of Life: Spirituality; Vanessa Prins
"There is no light without shadow and no psychic wholeness without imperfection. To round itself off, life calls not for perfection but for completeness; and for this the "thorn in the flesh" is needed, the suffering of defects without which there is no progress and no ascent." — Carl Jung (C. G. Jung; CW 12, par. 208)

May 2014 | Stages of Life: Death and Advanced Age; Vanessa Prins
"We grant goal and purpose to the ascent of life, why not to the descent? The birth of a human being is pregnant with meaning, why not death?" — Carl Jung (C.G. Jung; CW 8, par. 803)

April 2014 | Stages of Life: The Inferior Type and the Shadow; Vanessa Prins
"Thus it is not to be a detachment or redemption of the inferior function, but an acknowledgement of it, a coming to terms with it, that unites the opposites on the path of nature." — Carl Gustave Jung (CW 6, par. 115)

March 2014 | Stages of Life: The Inferior Type and the Soul; Vanessa Prins
"The inferior function is the door through which all the figures of the unconscious come into consciousness. Our conscious realm is like a room with four doors, and it is the fourth door by which the shadow, the animus or the anima, and the personification of the Self come in." — Carl Jung (M.L. von Franz, 1986)

February 2014 | The Stages of Life: Midlife; Vanessa Prins
"Civilized life today demands concentrated, directed conscious functioning, and this entails the risk of a considerable dissociation from the unconscious." — Carl Jung (CW 8, par. 139)

January 2014 | The Stages of Life: Work; Vanessa Prins
"In one man it is the capacity for thought, in another feeling, which is particularly amenable to development, and therefore impelled by cultural demands, he will concern himself in special degree with developing an aptitude to which he is already favourably disposed by nature." — Carl Jung (CW 6, par. 113)

November/December 2013 | The Stages of life: Communication; Vanessa Prins
"Wherever an impassioned, almost magical, relationship exists between the sexes, it is invariably a question of a projected soul-image." — Carl Jung (CW 6, par. 809)

October 2013 | The Stages of Life: Marriage; Vanessa Prins
"Wherever an impassioned, almost magical, relationship exists between the sexes, it is invariably a question of a projected soul-image." — Carl Jung (CW 6, par. 809)

September 2013 | The Stages Of Life: Adolescence; Vanessa Prins
". . . two children of the same mother may exhibit contrary attitudes at an early age, though no change in the mother's attitude can be demonstrated. Although nothing would induce me to underrate the incalculable importance of parental influence, this familiar experience compels me to conclude that the decisive factor must be looked for in the disposition of the child." — Carl G. Jung (CW 6, par. 560)

July/August 2013 | The Stages Of Life: Childhood; Vanessa Prins
"Ultimately it must be the individual disposition which decides whether the child belongs to this or that type despite the constancy of external conditions ... Under abnormal conditions, (i.e. when mother's attitude is extreme), a similar attitude can be forced on the child too, thus violating their individual disposition." — C.G. Jung (CW 6, par. 560)

June 2013 | The Stages of Life; Vanessa Prins
". . . beneath the neglected functions there lie hidden far higher individual values which, though of small importance for the collective life, are of the greatest value for the individual life, and are therefore vital values that can endow the life of the individual with an intensity and a beauty he will vainly seek in his collective function." — Carl Jung (CW 6, par. 113).

May 2013 | Extraverted Thinking: The Conceptual Gifts; James Graham Johnston
"In its essence this thinking is no less fruitful and creative than introverted thinking, it merely serves other ends." — Carl Jung (CW 6, par. 581)

April 2013 | Introverted Thinking: The Conceptual Gifts; James Graham Johnston
"The thinking of the introverted type is positive and synthetic in developing ideas which approximate more and more to the eternal validity of the primordial images." — Carl Jung (CW 6, par. 637)

March 2013 | Introverted Feeling: The Idealistic Gifts; James Graham Johnston
"The depth of this feeling can only be guessed--it can never be clearly grasped. It makes people silent and difficult of access; it shrinks back like a violet from the brute nature of the object in order to fill the depths of the subject. It comes out with negative judgments or assumes an air of profound indifference as a means of defense." — Carl Jung (CW 6, par. 638)

February 2013 | Extraverted Feeling: Social Gifts; James Graham Johnston
"A feeling judgment of this kind is not by any means a pretense or a lie, it is simply an act of adjustment." — Carl Jung (CW 6, par. 595)

January 2013 | Extraverted Sensation: The Practical Gifts; James Graham Johnston
"To feel the object, to have sensations and if possible to enjoy them--that is his constant aim." — Carl Jung (CW 6, par. 607)

November/December 2012 | Introverted Intuition: The Visionary Gifts; James Graham Johnston
"This image fascinates the intuitive activity; it is arrested by it and seeks to explore every detail of it. It holds fast to the vision, observing with the liveliest interest how the picture changes, unfolds, and finally fades." — Carl Jung (CW 6, par. 656)

October 2012 | Extraverted Intuition: The Catalytic Gifts; James Graham Johnston
"Because he is always seeking out new possibilities, stable conditions suffocate him . . . So long as a new possibility is in the offing, the intuitive is bound to it with shackles of fate." — Carl Jung (CW 6, par. 613)

September 2012 | Introverted Sensation: The Aesthetic Gifts; James Graham Johnston
"Sensation . . . undergoes considerable modification in the introverted attitude . . . How extraordinarily strong the subjective factor can be is shown most clearly in art." — Carl Jung (CW 6, par. 647)

July/August 2012 | The Shadow Type as a Moral Issue; James Graham Johnston
"The unconscious has an inimical or ruthless bearing towards consciousness only when the latter adopts a false or pretentious attitude." — Carl Jung (CW 7, par. 346)

June 2012 | Couplings; James Graham Johnston
"Closer investigation shows with great regularity that, besides the most differentiated function, another, less differentiated function of secondary importance is invariable present in consciousness and exerts a co-determining influence." — Carl Jung (CW 6, par. 666)

May 2012 | The Potent Dumbling; James Graham Johnston
"But the shadow is merely somewhat inferior, primitive, unadapted, and awkward, not wholly bad. It contains childish or primitive qualities which would in a way vitalize and embellish human existence, but--convention forbids . . . The educated man tries to repress the inferior man in himself, not realizing that by so doing he forces the latter into revolt . . . I should only like to point out that the inferior function is practically identical with the dark side of the human personality." — Carl Jung (CW 11&9i, par. 222-136)

April 2012 | The "Knock-Down Battle"; James Graham Johnston
"Usually this first conflict that is aroused between the auxiliary function in the conscious and its opposite function in the unconscious is the fight that takes place in analysis. This may be called the preliminary conflict. The knock-down battle between the superior and inferior functions only takes place in life." — Carl Jung (Lecture 9, 1925 Seminars)

March 2012 | Personality; James Graham Johnston
"Personality is a seed that can only develop by slow stages throughout life. There is no personality without definiteness, wholeness, and ripeness." — Carl Jung

February 2012 | Collaborations; James Graham Johnston
"The unconscious functions likewise group themselves in patterns correlated with the conscious ones. Thus, the correlative of conscious, practical thinking may be an unconscious intuitive-feeling attitude . . ." — Carl Jung

January 2012 | Oppositions
". . . so the birth of personality in oneself has a therapeutic effect. It is as if a river that had run to waste in sluggish side-streams and marshes suddenly found its way back to its proper bed, or as if a stone lying on a germinating seed were lifted away so that the shoot could begin its natural growth." — C. G. Jung

December 2011 | Jung's Types and Individuation
"You see, you get your orientation, you get your bearings, in the chaotic abundance of impressions through the four functions, these four aspects of total human orientation." — C. G. Jung